Mistress Mary, Quite Contrary,  Paper Quilt, (Paper, Ink & Thread) 10" x 12" (Mahogany Brown Wood Frame Measures 12" x 14") by Julie Mcintyre

Mistress Mary, Quite Contrary, Paper Quilt, (Paper, Ink & Thread) 10" x 12" (Mahogany Brown Wood Frame Measures 12" x 14")

From The Bedtime Stories Series:  This rhyme is reputed to refer Queen Mary Tudor (1516-1558), who was the daughter of King Henry VIII. Queen Mary was a staunch Catholic and the “garden” alludes to graveyards which were increasing in size with Protestant martyrs Bloody Mary had sentenced to torture and death.

“Silver bells” were thumbscrews which crushed the thumb between two hard surfaces by the tightening of a screw. The ‘cockleshells’ was another colloquialism for an instruments of torture which was attached to the genitals. The “ Maids” or Maiden was the nickname given to the  guillotine, a devise that beheads the victim, (although Bloody Mary’s condemned were usually burnt to death at the stake).

 It is interesting to note that executions during her reign totalled less than 300 which was an insignificant amount compared to the tens of thousand executions believed to be ordered by her father King Henry VIII.  Still, the Queen’s nickname “Bloody Mary” remains to this day.

$125.00 CAD